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Books

School Leaders, Teachers

Teaching the foundations of literacy – The DfE Reading Framework

For all teachers and educators involved in the teaching of early reading, the Department for Education’s new Reading Framework provides some great guidance when it comes to meeting expectations of teaching and provision. However, at 115 pages the policy document poses as quite an extensive bedtime read. In the following blog post, we have provided an easy to digest summary for all those interested to find out more.

Parents, School Leaders, Teachers, Technology

The new technology helping children with their reading!

To investigate the impact that COVID has had on children’s learning and literacy, The BBC One Show  sent poet, writer, and musician Benjamin Zephaniah to a primary school in Farnham. Having experienced disruption to his own education, due to moving around a lot as a child, he was able to share his own personal experiences of struggling when it comes to reading…

Parents, Teachers

Working memory to support learning…

The development of working memory is crucial to pupil engagement and academic success. In order to retain what they are learning; pupils need to develop strategies which support their memory and ultimately improve their ability to retain information and ultimately learn. The following blog post will look at the various areas of memory and suggest strategies and resources which may help.

Parents, Teachers

Supporting your child at home!

The announcement of lockdown 3 has seen huge numbers of parents and carers once again challenged with the task of home-schooling their children. Many will feel anxious and have concerns about their child’s mental health, or the impact that the another lockdown and unpredictable periods of self-isolation will have on their progress. We have put together some of our favourite tips to help parents support children from home in these challenging times.

School Leaders, Teachers

Using music to tackle literacy gaps!

Following a long period out of the classroom, many children may have taken a step backwards in literacy learning but, music, the world’s first and most popular language could help fill the gaps. In her recent article, dyslexia specialist tutor and assessor Dr Anne Margaret Smith, who has previously taught English for 30 years in Kenya, Germany, Sweden, and the UK, explains why music offers a fun and stress-free way to get these children back on track with their reading.

School Leaders, Teachers

The Gifts of Dyslexia!

Despite affecting around 10% to 15% of the population and being the highest incidence learning difference, Dyslexia is still perhaps of one the most misunderstood. Indeed, when we see statistics or hear discussions relating to the learning difference they all too often focus on dyslexia as an educational barrier and a challenge. Looking towards this years’ Dyslexia Awareness Week, it is important to recognise that Dyslexia is not a disadvantage but simply a different way of processing and interpreting information. 

School Leaders, Teachers

Tracking pupil eye movements to help aid the transition between primary and secondary schools

We know that finding out what level Year 7 pupils are working at will be harder than ever this September! Children will be entering secondary school without SAT scores or full details about their Year 6 attainment. By launching a secondary school version of our assessment, we can help provide an accurate view of students’ level of reading and comprehension in minutes and identify which of these children will need additional support as soon as they return to the classroom.

School Leaders, Teachers

Overcoming language barriers for EAL pupils

Picture a child in your classroom who is new to English, brimming with ideas, ready to learn and desperate to join in, yet lacking the words they need to fully engage with their learning. This child and many others like them may have joined your class halfway through the year, and now it’s your job to unlock their potential and give them a flying start to their learning journey. It’s a challenging scenario, and one faced by schools up and down the country. So what can you do to make a positive difference to EAL pupils whether they stay for six months or six years?